2017 Domaine Santa Duc Chateauneuf-du-Pape Les Saintes Vierges

Year: 2017
Appellation: Rhone
Country: France
Wine Spectator: 95
Wine Advocate: 96
Vinous Media: 94-95
Jeb Dunnuck: 91-93
Red Wine
Alcohol by Volume: 14.5%
Price :
$49.95

"Intense, with steeped red currant, plum and raspberry fruit forming the core, backed by red licorice and rooibos tea accents. A vibrant mineral streak runs through the fresh finish. Best from 2020 through 2035. 400 cases made, 50 cases imported. -JM" (WS)

"The 2017 Chateauneuf du Pape Les Saintes Vierges is a blend of Grenache, Mourvèdre and Counoise grown on light, sandy soils. Yet it's full-bodied and intense, almost creamy in texture, perhaps the most powerful of the four 2017s. Raspberries and cherries combine with Mediterranean herbs and hints of cinnamon, allspice, clove and star anise in a wine that shows remarkable balance and elegance despite the richness. It should drink well for at least a decade and a half.

This prominent Gigondas estate owns several small parcels in Chateauneuf du Pape, three of which are bottled separately. Young Benjamin Gras believes in a lengthy elevage, so this was a first chance to see the 2017s out of bottle, as well as the newly bottled 2018s. Unfortunately, there was no 2018 La Crau Ouest produced (mildew). " (WA)

"Lurid ruby. An exotically perfumed bouquet displays ripe red and blue fruit, Moroccan spice and floral qualities, and a smoky mineral topnote builds with air. Sweet, seamless and expansive on the palate, offering cherry preserve, Chambord, spicecake and cola flavors that show impressive depth and sharp delineation. The red fruit note carries strongly through a strikingly long, gently tannic finish that leaves behind a sexy lavender pastille note." (VM)

"The 2017 Châteauneuf-du-Pape Les Saintes Vierges comes from more sandy soils and is a more medium-bodied, elegant effort. Offering plenty of red fruits, dried earth, and spice-laced aromatics, ultra-fine tannins, and a silky, moderately intense mouthfeel, drink it on release and over the following 10-15 years." (JD)