2017 Chateau de Saint Cosme Gigondas

Year: 2017
Appellation: Rhone
Country: France
Wine Spectator: 93
Wine Advocate: 91-93
James Suckling: 94
Jeb Dunnuck: 90-92
Decanter: 92
Red Wine
Alcohol by Volume: 15.5%
Price :
$46.95

"This offers a mix of dark cherry, currant and blackberry compote flavors, scored liberally with singed alder, dried sage and warm earth accents through the finish. A flash of chestnut at the very end keeps this in the old-school camp. Solid for the vintage. Best from 2022 through 2035. -J.M." (WS)

"More concentrated and tannic than the 2016, the 2017 Gigondas shows outstanding potential. Marked by hints of charred wood and mocha, it's nevertheless rich, ripe and fruity, with a long finish.

Proprietor Louis Barruol continues to turn out some of the most exciting wines in his home appellation of Gigondas while expanding his négociant activities. For those who didn't know, he also has a joint venture to produce Riesling and Pinot Noir in New York's Finger Lakes. He's bullish on the Southern Rhône 2016s. As he said to me, "Maybe it is as good as 2010." He's tinkered with the Gigondas lineup, eliminating the Valbelle bottling and blending it with his Gigondas. The other bottlings are all single-parcel, 100% Grenache wines from le Claux, Hominis Fides and le Poste. Barruol is a champion of Gigondas's move to add white wine to the appellation. I reviewed his 2016 Côtes du Rhône le Poste last year, a barrel-fermented Clairette, and it has opened up a bit since then, making a more convincing case. Reviews of the Northern Rhône bottlings will be included at a later date." (WA)

"Wow. This has such attractive dark plums and berries with chocolate and cocoa, as well as ripe red and dark cherries. The complexity and depth is striking here. The palate carries so much flavor and so much detail. So lush. Rich dark fruit, cocoa and red-cherry pip to close. Drink over the next decade or more. This has plenty in the tank." (JS)

"A blend of 70% Grenache and the rest Syrah and Mourvèdre, the 2017 Gigondas is a sexy, ripe effort in a forward, already approachable style. Notes of black raspberries, graphite, pepper, and garrigue all dominate the bouquet, and it’s going to drink nicely right out of the gate." (JD)

"Whole-cluster fruit from limestone, marl and Miocene sand soils is fermented in concrete with indigenous yeasts. It's then aged 70% in barrel, 20% new, with the remaining 30% in concrete. It has a very oaky aromatic profile at this early stage, but it's joined by a lovely herbal aspect from the stems. Medium to full-bodied, the fruit has a vibrant freshness and the acidity is pretty marked, while the tannins are massy but ripe and harmonious. Long finish." (Decanter)

Winery Notes:
70% Grenache - 14% Syrah – 15% Mourvèdre - 1% Cinsault. Whole clusters.

Aged for twelve months: 20% in new casks - 50% in casks used for 1 to 4 wines - 30% in concrete tanks. Limestone marl and Miocene sand. Being a winegrower implies searching for, and perfecting, ways of maximising sense of place in one’s wines over an entire lifetime. Each location creates a kind of ‘technical pathway’. Each decision by a winegrower is like a crossroads where he or she can take the right, or the wrong, direction. There are no shortcuts and, generally speaking, when the wrong decision is made, it is hard to make amends. So, finding the right path for each location involves searching for a site’s ‘solution’, like a puzzle you attempt to solve. The ‘solution’ is quite simply allowing the ‘terroir’ to express itself freely. It is within this scheme of things, and only this one, that a wine can find its truth, its vibrancy, its consistency, and this intimate logic that is expressed throughout its life. Because wine is not a snapshot, but rather a feature film. So, when it comes to assessing a wine, it is better to have seen the whole film, and not just a few shots from the first five minutes.

Strawberry, violet, liquorice, pepper.

Bottled without filtration